Lent

Nothing great is ever achieved without much enduring.

—St. Catherine of Siena

About

Our observance of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday which falls on Feb. 17th this year. It is a day of fast and abstinence for Catholics. At Mass on Ash Wednesday, the imposition of ashes replicates an ancient penitential practice and symbolizes our dependence upon God’s mercy and forgiveness.

The three traditional pillars of Lenten observance are prayer, fasting and almsgiving. The church asks us to surrender ourselves to prayer and to the reading of Scripture, to fasting and to giving alms. The fasting we all do together on Fridays, is but a sign of the daily Lenten discipline of individuals and household fasting for certain periods of time, fasting from certain foods but also fasting from other things and activities. Likewise, the giving of alms is some effort to share this world equally, not only through the distribution of money, but through the sharing of our time and talents.

The key to fruitful observance of these practices is to recognize their link to baptismal renewal. We are called not only to abstain from sin during Lent, but to true conversion of your hearts and minds as followers ofChrist. We recall those waters in which we were baptized into Christ’s death, died to sin and evil, and began new life in Christ.

Lent Regulation

Prayer, fasting and almsgiving are the traditional pillars of our Lenten observance. Lent encourages us to place special emphasis on prayer-both personal prayer and praying together as God’s people. The time of Lent offers a heightened awareness of almsgiving works of justice and charity, and tending to those who are in need.

Fasting and abstinence challenge us to avoid attachments to the “things” of this world.

The Lenten Challenge

Lent is a season of prayer and penance set apart by the church to prepare us for Easter and to recall Our Lord’s fast in the desert. This season of preparation and sanctification can be fittingly accomplished through voluntary amendment of life, acts of penance, and work of charity. Lent is a time to learn to love our souls more than our bodies. This every Christian should make a special effort to practice mortification and strive for holiness during the forty days of Lent.

Do Not Let This Time To Grow In Holiness Pass You By!

Consider What You Should Do for Lent

(Click on the title for more information.)

Amendment of Life

Give up those things that you need to give up sooner or later, namely bad habits. Your goal her is to break a bad habit for ever and Lent is a good time to do it. Love your soul more than your body.

Examples

Gossiping, surfing the web without real need, watching TV, overeating, eating between meals, eating junk food, bad drinking habits, complaining, saying vulgar words, not getting up on time, using a snooze alarm, wasting time playing video games, going to movies, etc.

Acts of Penance

Perform some kind of penance: Your goal here is to train yourself to say “no” in little things so that you can say “NO” to big temptations later. You may resume doing the things you have given up here once Lent is over. Love your soul more than your body!

Examples

Avoid eating or drinking something that you enjoy, such as desserts. Give up eating out, taking hot showers, drinking alcoholic beverages, ets.

Works of Charity

Perform some good and holy actions. Your goal here is to strengthen your relationship with Christ and His Beloved Church. Ideally what you start here would continue in someway even after Lent is over. Love God more than yourself.

Examples

Perform some good and holy actions. Your goal here is to strengthen your relationship with Christ and His Beloved Church. Ideally what you start here would continue in someway even after Lent is over. Love God more than yourself.

Helpful Programs

Hallow Prayer Application Ad